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Designing San Francisco : art, land, and urban renewal in the City by the Bay

Author: Alison Isenberg
Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, [2017] ©2017
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
A major new urban history of the design and development of postwar San Francisco Designing San Francisco is the untold story of the formative postwar decades when U.S. cities took their modern shape amid clashing visions of the future. In this pathbreaking and richly illustrated book, Alison Isenberg shifts the focus from architects and city planners--those most often hailed in histories of urban development and  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Alison Isenberg
ISBN: 9780691172545 0691172544
OCLC Number: 954134366
Description: 436 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 25 cm
Contents: The illustrated pitch --
"Not bound by an instinct to preserve" --
"Culture-a-go-go" --
Married merchant-builders --
Managing property --
Movers and shakers --
"Urban renewal with paint" --
Model cities --
"The competition for urban land" --
Skyscrapers, street vacations, and the seventies.
Responsibility: Alison Isenberg.

Abstract:

A major new urban history of the design and development of postwar San Francisco Designing San Francisco is the untold story of the formative postwar decades when U.S. cities took their modern shape amid clashing visions of the future. In this pathbreaking and richly illustrated book, Alison Isenberg shifts the focus from architects and city planners--those most often hailed in histories of urban development and design--to the unsung artists, activists, and others who played pivotal roles in rebuilding San Francisco between the 1940s and the 1970s. Previous accounts of midcentury urban renewal have focused on the opposing terms set down by Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs - put simply, development versus preservation - and have followed New York City models. Now Isenberg turns our attention west to colorful, pioneering, and contentious San Francisco, where unexpectedly fierce battles were waged over iconic private and public projects like Ghirardelli Square, Golden Gateway, and the Transamerica Pyramid. When large-scale redevelopment came to low-rise San Francisco in the 1950s, the resulting rivalries and conflicts sparked the proliferation of numerous allied arts fields and their professionals, including architectural model makers, real estate publicists, graphic designers, photographers, property managers, builders, sculptors, public-interest lawyers, alternative press writers, and preservationists. Isenberg explores how these centrally engaged arts professionals brought new ideas to city, regional, and national planning and shaped novel projects across urban, suburban, and rural borders.
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"Isenberg, a professor of history at Princeton University, dug deep to capture the transitional years when the city's establishment was on the verge of being altered by cultural forces that it could Read more...

 
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