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Why we build : power and desire in architecture

Author: Rowan Moore
Publisher: New York, NY : Harper Design, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, 2013. ©2013
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In an era of brash, expensive, provocative new buildings, a prominent critic argues that emotions such as hope, power, sex, and our changing relationship to the idea of home are the most powerful force behind architecture, yesterday and (especially) today. We are living in the most dramatic period in architectural history in more than half a century: a time when cityscapes are being redrawn on a yearly basis,  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Rowan Moore
ISBN: 9780062277534 0062277537
OCLC Number: 827260762
Notes: Originally published in Great Britain by Picador in 2013.
Description: 392 pages : illustrations, plans ; 24 cm.
Contents: Desire shapes space, and space shapes desires --
The fixed and wandering home --
The true fake --
The inconstant horizon or notes on the erotic in architecture --
Power and freedom --
Form follows finance --
The rapacity of 'hope' --
Eternity is overrated --
Life, and the look of life --
Indispensable as bread.
Responsibility: Rowan Moore.

Abstract:

In an era of brash, expensive, provocative new buildings, a prominent critic argues that emotions such as hope, power, sex, and our changing relationship to the idea of home are the most powerful force behind architecture, yesterday and (especially) today. We are living in the most dramatic period in architectural history in more than half a century: a time when cityscapes are being redrawn on a yearly basis, architects are testing the very idea of what a building is, and whole cities are being invented overnight in exotic locales or here in the United States. Now, in a bold and wide-ranging new work, Rowan Moore former director of the Architecture Foundation, now the architecture critic for The Observer explores the reasons behind these changes in our built environment, and how they in turn are changing the way we live in the world. Taking as his starting point dramatic examples such as the High Line in New York City and the outrageous island experiment of Dubai, Moore then reaches far and wide: back in time to explore the Covent Garden brothels of eighteenth-century London and the fetishistic minimalism of Adolf Loos; across the world to assess a software magnate's grandiose mansion in Atlanta and Daniel Libeskind's failed design for the World Trade Center site; and finally to the deeply naturalistic work of Lina Bo Bardi, whom he celebrates as the most underrated architect of the modern era.
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