skip to content
Humans are underrated : what high achievers know that brilliant machines never will Preview this item
ClosePreview this item

Humans are underrated : what high achievers know that brilliant machines never will

Author: Geoffrey Colvin
Publisher: New York, New York : Portfolio/Penguin, [2015] ©2015
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"[T]he skills the economy values are changing in historic ways. The abilities that will prove most essential to our success are no longer the technical, classroom-taught left-brain skills that economic advances have demanded from workers in the past. Instead, our greatest advantage lies in what we humans are most powerfully driven to do for and with one another, arising from our deepest, most essentially human  Read more...
You are not connected to the UC Merced Library network. Access to online content and services may require you to authenticate with your library. Off-Campus Access
Getting this item's online copy... Getting this item's online copy...

Find a copy in the library

Getting this item's location and availability... Getting this item's location and availability...

WorldCat

Find it in libraries globally
Worldwide libraries own this item

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Geoffrey Colvin
ISBN: 9781591847205 1591847206
OCLC Number: 893894938
Description: viii, 248 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: Computers are improving faster than you are : as technology becomes more awesomely able, what will be the high-value human skills of tomorrow? --
Gauging the challenge : a growing army of experts wonder if must maybe the Luddites aren't wrong anymore --
The surprising value in our deepest nature : why being a great performer is becoming less about what we know and more about what we're like --
Why the skills we need are withering : technology is changing more than just work, it's also changing us, mostly in the wrong ways --
The critical 21st-century skill : empathy is the key to humans' most crucial abilities. It's even more powerful than we realize --
Empathy lessons from combat : how the U.S. military learned to build human skills that trump technology, and what it means for all of us --
What really makes teams work : it isn't what team members (or leaders) usually think. Instead, it's deeply human processes that most teams ignore --
The extraordinary power of story : why the right kind of narrative, told by a person, is mightier than logic --
The human essence of innovation and creativty : computers can create, but people skillfully interacting solve the most important human problems --
Is it a woman's world? In the most valuable skills of the coming economy, women hold strong advantages over men --
Winning in the human domain : some will love a world that values deep human interaction. Others won't. But everyone will neeed to get better --
and can.
Responsibility: Geoff Colvin.

Abstract:

"[T]he skills the economy values are changing in historic ways. The abilities that will prove most essential to our success are no longer the technical, classroom-taught left-brain skills that economic advances have demanded from workers in the past. Instead, our greatest advantage lies in what we humans are most powerfully driven to do for and with one another, arising from our deepest, most essentially human abilities--empathy, creativity, social sensitivity, storytelling, humor, building relationships, and expressing ourselves with greater power than logic can ever achieve. This is how we create durable value that is not easily replicated by technology--because we're hardwired to want it from humans. These high-value skills create tremendous competitive advantage--more devoted customers, stronger cultures, breakthrough ideas, and more effective teams. And while many of us regard these abilities as innate traits--"he's a real people person," "she's naturally creative"--It turns out they can all be developed"--
Retrieving notes about this item Retrieving notes about this item

Reviews

User-contributed reviews

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(4)

User lists with this item (4)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.